Active Listening

“The most basic of all human needs is the need to understand and be understood. The best way to understand people is to listen to them.”

– Ralph G. Nichols

 
I used to think that it was more important to be heard than to hear, but I couldn’t have been more wrong. Whether it’s a meeting, a presentation, or a one-on-one conversation, active listening is vital for understanding the needs and perspectives of my colleagues, clients, and customers.

Active listening is a communication technique that involves paying full attention to, understanding, and responding to the speaker. It’s more than just hearing what’s being said, it’s also picking up on nonverbal cues, body language, and tone of voice to grasp the full meaning of the message. It’s about interpreting the words and their underlying meaning and responding empathetically through verbal and nonverbal means. This is different from passive listening where the listener is simply hearing the words without fully absorbing or responding to the meaning behind them.

Active listening is a critical skill that is essential in building and maintaining professional relationships, resolving conflicts, and making better decisions.

What are the Benefits of Active Listening?


Active listening has many benefits, both for the listener and the speaker. Some of the main benefits include:

Better conversations: Active listening communicates to the other person that you care about what they are saying, which reduces the person’s guard and allows them to be more open about their thoughts and ideas.

Improved communication: Active listening helps to improve communication by ensuring that the listener fully understands the speaker’s message.

Increased trust and respect:
Active listening demonstrates that you value others’ opinions and ideas, which can help to build trust and respect.

Enhanced problem-solving: Active listening can help identify problems and opportunities more quickly, which can lead to better decision-making and problem-solving.

Increased productivity: Active listening can increase productivity by helping to identify and resolve issues more quickly, leading to more efficient communication and collaboration.

Better relationships: Active listening helps to build deeper, more meaningful relationships by allowing people to understand and connect with each other on a deeper level.

Empathy and emotional intelligence: Active listening allows the listener to understand the speaker’s emotional state, which can increase emotional intelligence and empathy.

Learning and growth: Actively listening to others can expose you to new information, perspectives, and ideas, which can help you learn and grow.

Conflict resolution: Active listening can help to resolve conflicts by helping both parties understand each other’s perspectives and find common ground.

Active listening is an essential skill for professionals in any field, as it can improve communication, build stronger relationships, and increase productivity. By actively listening, you will be better equipped to understand and connect with others, which can ultimately lead to greater success in your personal and professional life.

What are the key steps in Active Listening?


Active listening involves several key steps:

1. Pay attention: Give the speaker your full attention and try to eliminate any distractions. This means not only listening to the words they are saying, but also paying attention to their body language and tone of voice.

2. Show that you are listening: Use verbal and nonverbal cues to indicate that you are actively listening. This can include nodding, making eye contact, and making small verbal affirmations such as “I see” or “I understand.”

3. Ask questions: If you’re not sure you understand something, ask clarifying questions. This shows that you’re actively engaged in the conversation and helps ensure that you understand the other person’s perspective.

4. Paraphrase: Repeat back or paraphrase what the other person has said to confirm that you understand them correctly. This also helps to make sure that any misunderstanding will be prevented.

5. Show empathy: Try to put yourself in the other person’s shoes and understand their perspective. Showing empathy can help build rapport and make the conversation more productive.

6. Avoid interrupting: Let the person finish their thought before responding. It is important to let them speak without interruption.

7. Keep an open mind: Be open to new ideas and different perspectives. Avoid making assumptions and be willing to change your own point of view.

8. Keep the focus on the conversation: Avoid thinking about how to respond or getting distracted by other things. The focus should be on the person speaking and understanding their message.

Remember that active listening is a continuous process, it requires practice and effort to develop. It can take some time to master, but the benefits are well worth the effort.

What are some best practices with Active Listening?


Best practices for active listening include:

Making a conscious effort to actively listen: Active listening requires focus and attention, so it’s important to make a conscious effort to put aside distractions and actively listen to the speaker.

Setting aside personal biases and assumptions: Active listening requires an open mind, so it’s important to set aside personal biases and assumptions in order to truly understand the speaker’s message.

Showing respect for the speaker: Respectful communication is an essential part of active listening. Show respect for the speaker’s ideas and perspectives, even if you disagree with them.

Using reflective listening: Reflective listening is a technique where the listener reflects back on what the speaker has said, to ensure that the listener is understanding the speaker correctly.

Asking open-ended questions: To truly understand the speaker’s perspective, it’s helpful to ask open-ended questions rather than closed-ended questions.

Avoiding premature evaluation or jumping to conclusions: Listening actively before forming an opinion is crucial. It will prevent you from making assumptions and forming an opinion prematurely.

Being present: Be present in the conversation and avoid multitasking, picking up your phone, reading emails, or thinking about other things.

Practice, practice, practice: like any skill, active listening requires practice to master, so try to incorporate it into your daily interactions with others.

By following these best practices, you can develop the skill of active listening and become a more effective communicator. It will help you build stronger relationships, resolve conflicts and make better decisions.

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I hope you've gotten some new ideas and perspectives from Stratechi.com. If you want some one-on-one support from me, Joe Newsum, set up some time here. I'm a McKinsey alum who has also been the COO of the 9th fastest growing U.S. company, managed $120 million marketing budgets, led the transformation of 20,000 employees, successfully started two companies from scratch, and amassed a load of experience over my 25-year career. I really enjoy coaching clients and they get a ton of value too. You can see some of their testimonials here.  I have deep experience with this topic, strategic planning, career development, scaling up, workshops, leadership, presentation development & delivery, ramping up new roles, and much more. Read my take on developing a strategyClick here to learn more about me or book some time.

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