MEDDIC SALES METHODOLOGY & PROCESS

“Successful salespeople are not born; they are made.”

 

Sales is simply a series of conversations and MEDDIC is a sales methodology designed to guide the sales process from initial contact to closing the deal. It involves identifying the customer’s metrics, economic buyer, decision criteria, decision process, pain points, and exit criteria, and presenting a solution that addresses the customer’s pain points and aligns with their decision criteria. The goal of MEDDIC is to help sales teams focus on the key factors that drive purchasing decisions and develop a tailored, effective sales approach for each potential customer.

The MEDDIC sales methodology was created by Jack Napoli and Dick Dunkel, who were both sales executives at a high-tech company in the 1990s. They developed the MEDDIC methodology as a way to help sales teams focus on the key factors that drive purchasing decisions, and to guide the sales process from initial contact to closing the deal. MEDDIC helped them drive sales from $300 million to $1 billion in 4 years. The methodology has since been widely adopted by sales teams in a variety of industries and has become a popular tool for helping sales teams achieve success in their efforts.

What does MEDDIC Stand for?


To win more sales deals, faster, gather and utilize the information across the six elements of MEDDIC.

MEDDIC Sales Methodology

Metrics: Identify the key performance indicators (KPIs) that define success for the customer.

Economic buyer: Identify the person who has the authority to make a purchasing decision and the budget to do so.

Decision criteria:
Understand the factors that the economic buyer will consider when deciding whether to purchase your product or service.

Decision process: Understand the steps the economic buyer will go through to make a purchasing decision, including any internal approvals or evaluations that may be required.

Identify pain: Identify the problems or challenges that the customer is facing, and how your product or service can help solve them.

Champion: Identify and cultivate a champion in the organization to help you sell your product or service to key stakeholders.

Metrics

Identifying the key performance indicators (KPIs) that define success for the customer is a critical first step in the MEDDIC process. These metrics may include financial targets, operational efficiency, customer satisfaction, or other indicators that are important to the customer’s business. By understanding the metrics that matter most to the customer, sales teams can tailor their sales pitch to show how their product or service can help the customer achieve their goals.

Some good questions to understand the important metrics of a prospect are:

– What are your key performance indicators (KPIs) that define success for your business?
– How do you currently measure the performance of your business, and what targets do you aim to achieve?
– What impact do you hope to have on your business by implementing our solution?

Economic buyer

The economic buyer is the person who has the authority to make a purchasing decision and the budget to do so. It is essential to identify the economic buyer early in the sales process, as they will be the primary decision maker and will have the most influence on the outcome of the deal.

Here are a few questions to discover who the economic buyer is:

– Who is the primary decision maker for purchasing decisions within your organization?
– Who owns the budget for this type of purchase?
– What is the budget allocated for this type of solution, and how does it fit into your overall business strategy?

Decision criteria

Understanding the factors that the economic buyer will consider when deciding whether to purchase your product or service is key to developing a successful sales pitch. These criteria may include the cost of the product or service, the potential return on investment, the level of risk involved, and any other considerations that are important to the customer. By understanding the decision criteria, sales teams can tailor their pitch to address the most important concerns of the economic buyer.

Below are some questions to understand a the decision criteria of a customer:

– What factors do you consider when evaluating potential solutions?
– How do you prioritize these factors when making a purchasing decision?
– What is most important to you in a solution – cost, functionality, ease of use, etc.?

Decision process

Every organization has its own process for making purchasing decisions, and understanding the steps that the economic buyer will go through can help sales teams anticipate and prepare for any challenges or roadblocks that may arise. This may include internal approvals or evaluations that are required before a purchase can be made, or other stakeholders who may need to be involved in the decision-making process.

Here are the key questions to ask:

– How do you typically make purchasing decisions within your organization?
– Who else is involved in the decision-making process, and what role do they play?
– What are the steps that must be completed before a purchase can be made?

Identify & solve the pain points

In order to close a deal, sales teams must be able to demonstrate how their product or service can help solve the customer’s problems or challenges. Identifying the customer’s “pain points” – the problems or challenges that they are facing – is a key step in this process. By understanding the customer’s pain points, sales teams can tailor their pitch to show how their product or service can help address these issues and provide value to the customer.

Some good questions to figure out the pain points:

– What problems or challenges are you currently facing in your business?
– How do these problems or challenges impact your operations or bottom line?
– How do you currently address these problems or challenges, and how effective are these solutions?

Once the customer’s pain points have been identified, sales teams can present a solution that addresses these issues and aligns with the customer’s decision criteria. This may involve demonstrating how the product or service can help the customer achieve their goals, providing case studies or testimonials from other customers who have successfully used the product or service, or offering demos or trials to help the customer see the value of the product firsthand.

Champion

Identifying and cultivating a champion or two in the customer’s organization will pay dividends in higher close rates and faster deals. You’ll identify potential champions by their enthusiasm for the solution and their ability to influence others. Do all that you can to develop a strong relationship with a champion who can help you figure out a lot of the other MEDDIC topics and ultimately help you get the signatures you need to close the deal.

How do you implement MEDDIC?


Implementing the MEDDIC sales methodology in a sales team typically involves the following steps:

Train sales team members: The first step in implementing MEDDIC is to provide training to the sales team on the methodology and its key components. This may involve workshops or seminars to introduce the concept and provide examples of how it can be applied in real-world situations.

Create a MEDDIC checklist: A MEDDIC checklist is a tool that sales team members can use to ensure that they are gathering all of the necessary information and covering all of the key points in the sales process. The checklist should include questions or prompts for each component of the MEDDIC methodology, such as metrics, economic buyer, decision criteria, and so on.

Use MEDDIC in the sales process: Once sales team members have been trained on MEDDIC and have a checklist to guide their efforts, they should use the methodology in their interactions with potential customers. This may involve asking questions to gather information, presenting solutions that address the customer’s pain points, and working with the customer to validate the solution and determine the exit criteria.

Monitor and measure performance: To ensure that the MEDDIC methodology is effective and to identify areas for improvement, it is important to monitor and measure the performance of the sales team. This may involve tracking key metrics such as conversion rates, average deal size, and customer satisfaction, and using this data to identify areas where the sales team can improve their performance.

Overall, implementing MEDDIC in a sales team requires a combination of training, tools, and ongoing support to ensure that the methodology is effectively integrated into the sales process and is driving results for the organization.

What are some success factors with MEDDIC?


There are several factors that can contribute to the success of the MEDDIC sales methodology:

Adequate training: It is important that sales team members receive adequate training on the MEDDIC methodology and understand how to apply it in their interactions with potential customers. This may involve workshops or seminars to introduce the concept and provide examples of how it can be used in real-world situations.

Consistency: To be effective, the MEDDIC methodology must be consistently applied by all members of the sales team. This may involve using a MEDDIC checklist or other tool to ensure that all key points are covered in each sales interaction.

Customization: The MEDDIC methodology is designed to be tailored to the specific needs and goals of each potential customer. To be successful, sales teams must be able to customize their approach based on the customer’s unique pain points and decision criteria.

Active listening: To gather the necessary information and effectively address the customer’s pain points, sales team members must be good listeners and be able to ask open-ended questions to delve deeper into the customer’s needs and concerns.

Strong presentation skills: To effectively present solutions that address the customer’s pain points and meet their decision criteria, sales team members must have strong presentation skills and be able to clearly articulate the value of their product or service.

Follow-up and follow-through: It is important that sales team members follow up with potential customers after initial meetings to address any outstanding questions or concerns, and follow through on any commitments made during the sales process.

Overall, the success of the MEDDIC methodology depends on the ability of the sales team to gather the necessary information, tailor their approach to the specific needs of each potential customer, and effectively present solutions that address the customer’s pain points and meet their decision criteria.

The MEDDIC methodology is designed to help sales teams focus on the key factors that drive purchasing decisions, and to help them develop a tailored, effective sales approach for each potential customer. By gathering information on the customer’s metrics, the economic buyer, decision criteria, decision process, pain points, and champion, and presenting a solution that meets their needs, sales teams can increase their chances of closing deals and achieving success in their sales efforts.
 

Other Sales Methodologies

Solution Selling
Target Account Selling
SPIN Selling
The MEDDIC Selling Methodology
GAP Selling
The Challenger Sales Method
 

Check out our guide to Sales Strategy

Check out our 100-page Sales Strategy PowerPoint Template

 

NEXT SECTION: SPIN SELLING

 

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